Always Be Disintegrating

UConn is constructing a dorm wing to be reserved for African American males. The concern trolling is on full display: “But I thought we fought to end segregation!” “This is racist!” The honest trolls ask the right question: “Why can’t white males have a dorm to themselves?”

(Well, white males do have a way to carve out a university space for—mostly—white males: they’re called fraternities.)

Instead of whining, the correct response to this story is to give it full approval. Maybe a few academic elites are rediscovering the age-old wisdom that segregated spaces can be a good thing as long as the segregation is willing and consensual. Thankfully, it appears that UConn administrators are not defending their black dorm with anti-racist cant. They’re being honest about the value of sharing space with people just like you.

“It is a space for African American men to come together and validate their experiences that they may have on campus . . . it’s also a space where they can have conversation and also talk with individuals who come from the same background, who share the same experience,” said Hines.

Organic solidarity and segregation beat forced tolerance and connection every time. It’s a lesson progressive elites need to re-learn.

 

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2 comments
  1. dcsunsets said:

    Would you define it as “not consensual” if people who were laboring to support a system chose to self-segregate and wall out those who felt it necessary to parasitize them? Are the “haves” not allowed to keep what they produce if the “have nots” don’t want their cash cows to leave?

    I just wonder (out loud) what would happen if capable people one day decide to simply leave, form their own society and tell the not-so-capable people that wealth redistribution from the former to the latter is no longer to be tolerated by the former.

    If we’ve seen Peak Togetherness, and the future is to be characterized by secession, will the doers be allowed to withdraw their contributions if separation occurs along the fault lines of productivity?

    Like

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